Items 1 to 10 of 1156 total

By Marjory J. Sente

Today, New Year’s Day is often spent watching the Rose Parade, bowl games, or even taking a Polar Bear Splash. In territorial Prescott, however, the custom of calling was a popular way to spend the afternoon and evening of the year’s first day.

Some say calling on New Year’s Day was a Dutch custom; others attribute it to the Scottish custom of Hogmanay. Whatever the origin, it had specific elements: women, and frequently their single daughters, held open houses; men, usually young, did the calling; refreshments were served and men’s calling cards were a must.

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By Bob Baker

The Yavapai County Courthouse and plaza in Prescott have been the focus of Christmas celebrations since early in the town’s history. The Dec 28, 1867 Arizona Miner reported that on Dec 24th a Christmas Eve celebration was held in the “new Court House” on Cortez St. just north of Gurley and that “A tree had been erected and covered with everything imaginable that was obtainable in Prescott.” On December 31, 1874, the newspaper reported that hundreds of people entered the Courtroom on Christmas Eve where they saw the public-school children seated by a row of Christmas trees singing Christmas carols. Later, Santa Claus arrived and gifts were given to the children.

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By Mick Woodcock

Herbert Bowers secured the appointment as post trader, or sutler, at the newly established military post of Camp Whipple before it was moved to the banks of Granite Creek in May 1864. By that time, he was headed to California, via La Paz, to bring back goods for his new store. By August, he was back with his brother Nathan to establish their business.

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By Mick Woodcock

When Herbert and Phoebe Bowers were raising their family of twelve children in Greenfield, New Hampshire in the 1820s and 1830s, they had no idea that six of their sons would have an impact on America’s westward expansion. Bowers was a stonemason by occupation. He was afflicted with consumption, known today as tuberculosis, which caused his death in 1860.  

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By Worcester P. Bong

Fiorello La Guardia, Buckey O’Neill, and Barry Goldwater are among a few of the famous people who have been associated with Prescott at some point in their lives. Another lesser known yet successful Prescott resident was Lieutenant Colonel Raymond Whitcomb Bliss.
 

Born on May 17, 1888 in Chelsea, Massachusetts, he graduated as an honor student from Tufts Medical College in 1910 with a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree. In 1911 he joined the Army Medical Reserve Corps as a lieutenant. In 1913 he became a commissioned medical officer and attended the Army Medical School in Washington, D.C., graduating in June 1913.
 

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Frontier Thanksgiving

Nov 21, 2020

By Susan Cypert

Life on the frontier was hard, both physically and emotionally, and survival often depended on new settlers learning to forage off the land by hunting, fishing and gathering berries, nuts and edible bulbs. The harsh reality of feeding a family, especially during the long winter months, was a constant concern. Homesteaders and ranchers were frequently isolated and had to be largely self-sufficient, especially until the seeds they brought west with them became gardens and crops, or if they had lost their milk cow on the journey or had not brought chickens with them.

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By Elizabeth Bourgault

On July 9, 1946, a Boeing B-17G “Flying Fortress” bomber, converted into a transport plane, crashed into Mount Tom in Holyoke, MA, killing all 25 on board.  Aboard were 15 U.S. Coast Guardsmen, 8 members of the Army Air Corps and two civilians, a U.S. Public Health doctor and an American Red Cross member.  Two members of the Army Air Corps were from Prescott, the pilot, Flight Officer Herman (Joe) Valdrini, Jr., 24 and Radio Operator Sgt. Daniel Roberts (Pat) Roe, 20.
 

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By Judy Stoycheff

Within days of his inauguration as President of the United States in March 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered his secretaries of War, Interior, Agriculture and Labor to create a program that would improve conservation of the land and provide employment for as many as a quarter of a million men.  He named it the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC).  During this time, the country was in the midst of the Great Depression with very high unemployment and poverty levels.

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Exploring Arizona

Oct 31, 2020

By Mick Woodcock

Arizona was nicknamed the “Baby State” for forty-seven years until Alaska’s statehood. Before that, she was a territory for forty-nine years. For the previous fifteen years, much of the area was part of the New Mexico Territory. From when it was first explored and settled by the Spanish until today, Arizona has remained sparsely populated, her topography and mineral riches both helping and hindering settlement.

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By Drew Desmond

For residents of Prescott today, J.S.Acker is remembered most warmly. Due to his philanthropy, the popular annual downtown music festival held during the holiday season is named in his honor. However, while he was alive, most considered him to be a bit cranky and cantankerous.

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