Items 1 to 10 of 1326 total

By Marjory J. Sente 

 

Miss Helen A. McNutt was Prescott’s first woman postmaster (sometimes informally referred to as a postmistress), serving from 1931 to 1936. On April 28, 1931, President Herbert Hoover approved Miss McNutt’s commission as postmaster. Earning $200 a month, an excellent salary at the time, she succeeded Warren F. Day, who remained in the office until May 1 while she wrapped up her secretarial duties at the law firm of Favour and Baker. McNutt was active in the local Business and Professional Women’s Club, holding the position of president at the time of her appointment as postmaster.

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By Kristen Kauffman

 

In recognition of Distracted Driving Awareness Month, here's Kristen Kauffman with a reminder of how people dealt with the very different kinds of accidents that occurred in the 1800s…

 

On February 1, 1873, a Prescott newspaper, the Arizona Miner, reported on a detective chasing a diamond swindler across the country and then to Europe. There were stories about the Arizona Territory erecting schools and selecting instructors and about balls being hosted at townspeople’s houses and in public spaces. Nestled between an article about church services offered in the area and an ad for Wm. B. Hooper & Co. General Merchandise was this article offering advice:

 

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Victorian Hopi

Mar 26, 2024

By Brenda Cusick

 

Can you imagine a well-born woman living in Manhattan during the Victorian era moving to the sparsely populated Hopi Mesas in Northern Arizona? Prescott pioneer Kate Thomson Cory did exactly that in 1905. Cory was a university-trained painter and photographer who taught young ladies during New York’s “Gilded Age” at prestigious Cooper Union College. At a meeting of the Pen and Brush club she met a fellow artist, Louis Akin. He convinced her to travel west and join an artist colony he was putting together at the Hopi Mesas.

 

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By Kristen Kauffman

 

John P. Bourke (sometimes John T.) served as Yavapai County Sheriff from January 24, 1866, until July 1, 1867. Bourke collected taxes, oversaw the building of a new jail, appointed undersheriffs and oversaw elections. A few times he organized Sheriff’sSales—auctions on the Plaza with proceeds benefiting private owners who couldn’t themselves organize the sale. But some of his other activities read like action-packed westerns.

 

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By Kristen Kauffman

 

In 1930s Prescott, kids were told to stay away from the dangerous red light district. Postmaster Gail Gardner wouldn’t even name it. To him it was “the restricted zone.” In her oral history archived at the Sharlot Hall Museum, Mittie Cobey recounts a night when she was a teen driving around with a boy after dark. They were not supposed to be near Goodwin and Granite Streets. But on this night, as they neared the alley behind the Hotel St. Michael, Cobey saw a man clutching his belly. Fifty yards behind him, she saw a man holding a gun. She was sure the one man shot the other because the victim was “bothering his girls,” as Cobey said, “the cribs were right there.”

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By Marjory J. Sente

 

Members of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) always have found creative ways to raise money for their projects. Perhaps none was more creative than collecting funds to buy trees when President General Sarah Corbin Robert selected the Penny Pines Project to celebrate the National Society’s golden anniversary in 1940.

 In the late 1930s, the United States faced two major issues—the Great Depression and ecological disasters such as deforestation in the Appalachian Mountains and other forests that were in deplorable condition from over-harvesting, devastating fires and little replanting.

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By John Sterr of the Jerome Historical Society

 

The town we now know as Jerome began in 1876 when Angus McKinnon and Marion A. Ruffner officially recorded their mining claims in the area. As mining increased over the next two decades, a camp sprang up to house, feed and serve the growing population of mines. Mr. Eugene Murray Jerome and Mrs. Paulina Von Scheidau Jerome of New York City secured capital investment in the copper camp. It was named Jerome in 1882.

 

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By Dale O’Dell

 

(All images provided were photographed by the author, © Dale O’Dell 2023. Reproduction permission granted by the photographer for use by the Prescott Daily Courier and Sharlot Hall Museum. No AI was used to write this article or in the capture and post-processing of the photos. Dale O’Dell contact information: dalesv650@gmail.com , 928-925-0374, www.dalephoto.com).

 

Sedona and Scottsdale are well known art destinations, but most people don’t realize the entire Southwestern United States is an art destination, including Prescott. This art isn’t in galleries. Two-hundred-plus years ago what appeared to be a vast, empty landscape revealed a treasure of ancient rock art. Petroglyphs (ancient rock carvings) and pictographs (ancient rock paintings) were found in large numbers in what is now Yavapai County and Prescott. These enigmatic artistic symbols were created hundreds, even thousands, of years ago by the possible prehistoric ancestors of what are now local indigenous tribes including, but not limited to, the Navajo, Hopi, Apache and Yavapai-Prescott. The tradition of marking on stone goes back over twenty thousand years.

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By Tom Collins

 

Carrie Stephens, the daughter of Arizona pioneer Varney Stephens, was married off to a scoundrel and poseur named W. Claude Jones when she was just 15 years old. Her groom, 49 years old, who had been Speaker of the House of Representatives for the First Territorial Arizona Legislature, deserted her after just a few months of marriage. Unbeknownst to the Stephens family, he absconded to Hawaii, where he wormed his way into politics and married a young Hawaiian girl descended from nobility.

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By Tom Collins

 

The story of Carrie Stephens, Arizona pioneer, illustrates the subservient position of women in the early years of Prescott’s colorful history. Ambitious businessmen sometimes used their nubile daughters as pawns in a chess game of social and economic advancement in Prescott, a village of about 400 men and only 28 women at the end of its founding year, 1864. The First Territorial Legislature, which convened in Prescott in September 1864, set the age of sexual consent at ten years old, perhaps to facilitate child marriage.

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