Items 1 to 10 of 1231 total

By Marjory J. Sente

An early proprietor, H. (Henry) C. Vincent, and his family experienced the full circle of life at the hotel. Moving back to Prescott from Williams, he took over the Congress House on October 10, 1901.
 

Early ads boasted “Everything Strictly First-Class.” However, the January 29, 1902 Arizona Weekly Journal-Miner announced the hotel would soon be remodeled, adding ten rooms and other improvements. During the renovation, Vincent changed the name from Congress House to Hotel Congress.
 

Read More

By Marjory J. Sente

When the Congress Hotel burned down on July 12, 1923, a Prescott landmark was gone, but its history and the memories of the people who lived and visited there were not extinguished.

Built in 1878 by Fred W. Williams, the hotel was called the Williams House and then the Congress House until it was renamed the Hotel Congress in 1902. Located at 124 - 126 E. Gurley Street (present site of the Hassayampa Inn), it was close to the Plaza and downtown. It became a popular place for women traveling alone, Phoenicians looking for cool summers and travelers from around the US seeking mild winters.

Read More

By Bradley G. Courtney

There’s a touching legend that has been shared for decades along Whiskey Row that speaks of a baby who was won in a gambling game after being abandoned atop a bar counter of a prominent Whiskey Row saloon. The tale has been featured in newspapers, magazines, books and poetry. Of the hundreds extant, it’s perhaps Arizona’s best and most famous saloon story.

Read More

The July 16, 1919 edition of the Weekly Journal-Miner announced a 2,809-yard, par 36, nine-hole golf course was built at the target range at Whipple Barracks. The target range (now Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Pioneer Park area) was roughly six miles north of Whipple Barracks. Conceived by Commanding Officer Bliss and Captain McNabb, the Whipple Barracks golf course was described as one of the “sportiest” links with an abundance of natural hazards. Prairie dog holes, brush, cactus and other numerous breaks in the ground made it difficult to play. Greens were constructed of special sand, oiled and rolled. An article titled “‘Fore’ instead of ‘Fire’ heard on Rifle Range” in the July 26, 1919 edition of The West’s Recall newspaper reported that transportation to and from the course was provided and golf clubs and balls were furnished.

Read More

By Tyler J. Elsberry

The genesis of the World’s Oldest Rodeo can be traced to the development of early Prescott. Founded in 1864, Prescott grew as miners and cattlemen flocked to the area. The cattlemen capitalized on the area’s remoteness to establish numerous ranches. These ranches attracted cowboys who brought new blood to Prescott and supported the town’s economy. Ranches held biannual roundups (rodeos) during which cowboys engaged in long, arduous work. Afterward, they reveled in comparing their skills. These cowboy contests initially provided opportunities to establish bragging rights on who was the best roper or best bronc rider. Outside spectators and participants alike would root for and bet on their favored competitors.

Read More

By Bob Harner

Although the popular image of Prescott in the late 1800’s may be of a wild frontier town centered on Whiskey Row, with drunken cowboys and miners engaging in frequent bar brawls and shootouts, the reality was far different. While the town had its wild west aspects, it also had a thriving and active “high society,” with the same kinds of community activities, sophisticated entertainments and social conventions as more “civilized” Eastern cities.

Read More

By Nancy Burgess

This is Part 2 of a true story about an automobile – a 1913 Studebaker SA25 “machine” and the people who took it on an approximately 1,000-mile tour of Arizona in 1913.

An Arizona Auto Adventure: Clarence Boynton’s 1913 Travelogue” is the story of the excitement, sights, experiences, trials and tribulations of a road trip in the early days of automobile travel in a place and time when the “Wild West” of Arizona was still in evidence. The book includes all of Clarence Boynton’s journal of the trip, which he titled “An Account of the Watkins-Boynton 1,000 Mile Tour Through Northern Arizona, August 28 to October 3, 1913.” It is a treasure, and gives today’s traveler an eye-opening glimpse of travel in Arizona just one year after statehood.

Read More

By Bob Baker

The title is only one of John Hance’s outlandish claims made to fellow travelers and visitors to the Grand Canyon from the late 1800s to 1919. He and his brother George arrived in the new town of Prescott in the Arizona Territory in December, 1868 and purchased land to farm along Granite Creek. The following year, John sold his share of the farm and homesteaded Orme Ranch, living on his earnings as a teamster. While hauling wood and hay for Fort Whipple and Camp Verde, he often entertained his fellow teamsters and travelers with tall tales of the old west. When the military business dropped off, he went bankrupt.

Read More

By Parker Anderson

This year, Prescott celebrates the 50th anniversary of the release of Sam Peckinpah’s motion picture, “Junior Bonner,” starring Steve McQueen. In 1972 it was not a commercial success nationwide, but locally, Prescott has always regarded it as “our” movie, filmed entirely in Prescott and set in Prescott against the backdrop of the Frontier Days rodeo.

Read More

By Stuart Rosebrook

Fifty years ago, ABC Pictures was preparing to leave the movie business, but first, they had two final productions to release: Cabaret on February 13 and Junior Bonner on June 20, 1972. Both had major casts and directors and received positive reviews. Both are considered classics in their genres.

How did Junior Bonner get produced in Prescott? It started with the screenwriter making an inspirational trip in 1970 to Prescott’s 4th of July rodeo.

Read More

Items 1 to 10 of 1231 total

Close