Items 1 to 10 of 1171 total

By Bob Harner

Charlie Meadows toured Europe with Buffalo Bill Cody’s wild west show from August through mid-October, 1892, during which Cody reportedly gave him his new nickname, Arizona Charlie. Returning to Vancouver, Charlie discovered that his wife, Marion, had made good her threat to disappear, along with their unborn child.
 

Undeterred, Charlie returned to Arizona and used the money earned on his Asian and European tours to form his own wild west troupe, Arizona Charlie’s Historical Wild West. The show opened March 25, 1893 at the Phoenix racetrack, where 2500 spectators saw bronc riding, trick riding and roping, steer roping, bull riding, trick bicycle riding, bola throwing and either a stage coach robbery or an Indian attack on a settler’s cabin (depending on the show time).
 

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By Bob Harner

While Buffalo Bill Cody’s wild west show remains famous, in his time Cody faced competing western showmen. One largely forgotten today is Arizona Charlie Meadows.
 

Born Abraham Henson Meadows, March 10, 1860 in Visalia, California, his father (a Confederate sympathizer) changed his name to Charles when Lincoln was elected. In 1877, the family moved north of Payson to Diamond Valley. In 1882, Charlie (then 22) was asked to guide an army detachment to the Mogollon Rim. In his absence, Apaches attacked his homestead, killing his father and wounding two of his brothers, one of whom later died.
 

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By Worcester P. Bong

Between 1931 and 1950, the Veterans Administration (VA) built and renovated numerous rural hospitals, and in 1931, it acquired the old hospital/sanatorium complex on the former Fort Whipple grounds in Prescott as part of that effort. Until then, the complex served as a U.S. Army hospital and U.S. Veterans Bureau hospital.
 

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By Susan Cypert

In songs, speeches and stories, Katie became one of the early environmental movement’s loudest and fiercest voices, along with people like Edward Abbey and his Monkey Wrench Gang and David Brower, Sierra Club founder. Her anger at the federal government, especially the “Wreck-the-Nation Bureau” (Bureau of Reclamation) fueled her music and made her a magnet for filmmakers. Many people know Katie Lee from her cameo appearance in the documentary DamNation, where she shared photos from her last trip through Glen Canyon.
 

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By Susan Cypert

From 1954, when she first ran Glen Canyon, Katie Lee stayed on the road for the next ten years, crisscrossing America in a 1950’s Thunderbird coupe, singing in popular nightclubs and returning fifteen times to Glen Canyon, often paying her way on the trips by singing folk songs for tourists.
 

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By Jenny Pederson

Sharlot Mabridth Hall, founder of the Sharlot Hall Museum, was an opinionated, independent woman with a thirst for learning. She came to Arizona as a child in 1882 and quickly became fascinated with the Territory’s history. Trips into the growing town of Prescott and conversations with “old-timers” knowledgeable about the early history of Arizona further encouraged this fascination.

 

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By Susan Cypert

She was called many things in her lifetime: blunt, foul-mouthed, blissfully profane, eloquent, free-spirited, joyful raconteur, badass, the Goddess of Glen Canyon, Kickass Katie, Grand Dame of Dam busting. A woman with grit, grace and humor. A woman who took no “s…,” liked saying “f…,” who once rode naked through Jerome on a bicycle.
 

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By Mick Woodcock

In early Prescott, New Year’s was a minor celebration. The first mention in the Arizona Miner was December 29, 1866: “New Years Balls – Two fashionable dancing parties are to come off next Tuesday night – one at the Osborn House, and the other at the new (word unintelligible), lately fitted up at the east end of the Capitol Building.” These had an admission charge and featured food, beverages and dancing.
 

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By Barbara Patton

In December 1864, Prescott, the fledgling capital of the Arizona Territory, was barely a town, laid out with a few dirt streets and trails leading into the forest and mining camps.  There were probably a few hundred miners and soldiers within reach of the town, plus a few families who had moved into the settlement.

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By Mick Woodcock

In 1918, the war raging in Europe was not the only place to see the death of a Prescott man, when Robert J. Miller was shot to death by Harry Earl “Bud” Stephens at Oscar W. Bruchman’s store in Prescott on April 2, 1918. This was the conclusion of the coroner’s jury summoned by Yavapai County coroner Charles H. McLane.
 

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