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By Marjory J. Sente

For Christmas in 1908 Minnie White received a Christmas-themed penny post card from a W. Johnson. This attractive card, manufactured by Dennson’s, featured a snowy scene with people going to church. At that time, no messages were allowed on the address side of the post card. However, Johnson snuck his or her first initial and name in the upper left corner along with Minnie’s name and address. Mailed in Prescott on December 21, the card reached Harrington, where Miss White lived, two days later. Harrington was a mining town nestled in the Bradshaw Mountains south of Prescott. It was named for George P. Harrington, a mine operator and owner who established the Oro Belle mine and operated the Tiger Mine.

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By Worcester P. Bong

An icon of the past, the 129-foot Mayer stack was built for a smelter plant expansion in Mayer, Arizona. Many articles, including two Days Past articles (Prescott Courier, June 18, 1990; Daily Courier, October 20, 1996), have been written about this stack. This article provides more detail about the stack’s history and current information on its status.

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By Mick Woodcock

As you drive toward Cordes Junction on Arizona Highway 69, the ruins of what was originally King Woolsey’s Agua Frio Ranch are visible on the left as you near the town of Humboldt. What remains of this historic ranch is minimal, only a vague reminder that this was once the first building in the area and was for years a reference point for the Agua Frio Valley, for that is how it was known in those days.

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By Bob Baker

During the 1800s, mules were an essential part of the settlement and development of Prescott - indeed, of the Arizona Territory. Frontiersmen and early prospectors rode saddle mules and carried their provisions and equipment on pack mules. Early settlers used mules to ride, haul supplies, plow fields and transport equipment. Freight and stage lines often used them on their more mountainous routes. The U.S. Army quickly recognized the mules’ adaptability and began using them to ride and in pack trains in mountainous terrain.    

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By Bob Harner

While the Central Highlands of Arizona has its share of famous historical figures, we should also remember the many ordinary people in Arizona’s past whose courage and hard work helped transform a territorial wilderness. Today the remains of a stone cabin and a pair of graves are among the few reminders that ordinary people like Wales and Sarah Arnold lived here.

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By Elizabeth Bourgault

Throughout Yavapai County’s history, war has impacted the lives of those who served and those who were left behind. The Vietnam War was one of our longest wars. According to U.S. casualty reports, 58,220 (numbers vary) service men and women died during the conflict. Twenty of those were from Yavapai County. Still listed as Missing in Action (MIA) is Lieutenant Commander Dennis Stanley Pike from Bagdad.

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By Robert Estrada

In 2017 during a quest to discover an indigenous family history, three separate tales coalesced into the story of an Apache woman known as Lulu Verde. Captured by the Army as a toddler in the 1870s, Lulu lived with Euro-Americans and married a white man in the 1880s.

First mention of Lulu came from Mr. Vincent Randall, Director of the Yavapai-Apache Cultural Center at the Yavapai-Apache Nation, who relayed the legend of a family member who spent her life with whites following a massacre. The Camp Verde Journal of November 30, 1994 mentioned that the earliest Euro-American settlers in the Verde Valley adopted an Apache girl “as their daughter.” National Park Historian Jack Beckman referred to her in his memoirs, recording that homesteaders Wales and Sarah Arnold raised a young Apache girl “as their beloved daughter.” With the assistance of Sheila Stubler at Fort Verde State Park and later interviews, Lulu’s descendants provided answers to many previously unanswered questions.  

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By Stuart Rosebrook

Over Labor Day weekend in September 1970, screenwriter Jeb Rosebrook received a call from his agent Mike Wise. “Robert Redford wants a rodeo story. Do you have one?” Wise asked. Little did the agent know that his North Hollywood-based writer had just written a first draft of “Bonner,” a short story about an aging rodeo star whose career, family and hometown are all on the line. Wise also didn’t know “Bonner” was a highly personal tale about my father’s adopted hometown. Rosebrook had found his inspiration for “Bonner” after a short visit back to Prescott on July 4th for the 1970 World’s Oldest Rodeo. Little did anyone know the short story would change the fate of so many, so quickly—especially our family.
 

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By Marjory J. Sente

Summer of 1895 proved to be a watershed season for women living in Prescott. A leader in the women’s movement came to town, provided them with inspiration, and they never looked back.

When Mrs. May Wright Sewall joined her husband Theodore in Phoenix in March 1895, she was front page news for the Arizona Republican. An article in its March 27 issue was titled “A Worker for Women” and detailed many of her accomplishments, including organizing the World’s Congress of Women at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago.

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By Heidi Osselaer

Who would be crazy enough to hire a sports commentator who did not know the difference between a box score and a boxcar? Who thought the little cushions on the baseball diamond were there in case a player fell?  Lyle Abbott, the city editor of the Arizona Republican newspaper, that’s who. And as it turned out, his hiring of Sally Jacobs, the paper’s society editor, to be a sportswriter was a stroke of pure genius.
 

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