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By Barbara Patton

The last article introduced the architect/designer Mary Colter, who, in the early 20th century, was designer/architect for the Fred Harvey Co. which built hotels and serviced train depots along the route of the Santa Fe Railroad from Chicago to Los Angeles.         
                      
In 1905, Mary designed the Hopi House next to the El Tovar Hotel. In 1914 the Harvey Co. built the scenic Hermit Rim Road from the Bright Angel trailhead along the edge of the Canyon. At the end of this eight-mile wagon road, they wanted a place where visitors could stop and refresh themselves. Hermit’s Rest was Mary’s next assignment.
 

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By Barbara Patton

Most everyone in our country is looking forward to a time when we can again travel freely to our favorite vacation spots in and around the United States. Here in Arizona, we have many beautiful places to visit, most notably Grand Canyon National Park.  
    
While the canyon itself is a geological wonder, the park offers other sites to see.  During the early years of tourism to the Grand Canyon, some unique and beautiful manmade buildings were added to help serve the visiting public. Many of these were designed and decorated by the architect/designer Mary Colter - - a woman ahead of her time.
    

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Stage to Prescott

May 23, 2020

By Bob Baker

Public travel in the late 1800’s to Prescott was not for the faint-hearted, nor was it inexpensive. Passengers endured night and day travel with very short stops, in the freezing cold or sweltering heat, with constant dust and not infrequent rain. At times, passengers had to leave the coach and walk when traveling up steep grades, crossing washes or when the coach got bogged down in mud or sand.

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The Pandemic of 1918

May 16, 2020

By Mick Woodcock

The United States was somewhat slow on the uptake in dealing with the flu pandemic of 1918 as a national health hazard. Part of this may have been because World War I was in full swing.

The Weekly Journal-Miner, November 2, 1918, featured a front-page article with the headline “Spanish ‘Flu’ Claims Many New Victims.” This Associated Press (AP) article from Washington, D.C. dated September 30 stated there were more than 20,000 new cases in army camps from the previous forty-eight hours. There is no mention in the local headlines of the virus in Yavapai County.

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By Worcester P. Bong

National Hospital Day was first declared by President Warren G. Harding in 1921 as a way to rebuild American trust in hospitals following the Spanish flu pandemic that claimed more than 675,000 American lives. Celebrated on May 12th (the birthday of famed nurse Florence Nightingale, who helped establish hospital standards during the 1854 Crimean War), it was intended as a day for hospitals to educate the public about medical care.
 

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By Eric Jacobson

Yavapai County Sheriff William J. Mulvenon (b. 1851 - d. 1915) played a crucial role in the Pleasant Valley War that resulted in the highest number of deaths of all range wars in the American West. It is estimated that between 1882-1892, 35 to 50 persons died as two feuding families, the Tewksburys and Grahams, fought over land, sheep and cattle. Few combatants were arrested, but Yavapai Sheriff Billy Mulvenon attempted to follow Arizona Territorial Governor Conrad Zulick’s instructions in 1887 to finally end the conflict. One of the consequences of the decade-long violence was the conclusion reached by federal authorities that the Arizona Territory was not ready for statehood.

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By Mick Woodcock

John Marion, editor of the Arizona Miner, regularly reported on disruptions of the peace in Prescott, particularly when it involved soldiers from Fort Whipple. Some of this might be explained by an article in the December 28, 1867 issue where the editor describes an incident from earlier in the week.

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By Mick Woodcock

Because of the unruly activities in Fort Whipple’s enlisted ranks, the local newspaper felt it necessary to call the officers of the fort into question about soldier-related shootings, but reminded all in an October 1867 notice, “In Force. – The act of the Legislature regarding the use of fire arms in towns, and the vagrant act are now in force.”

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By Mick Woodcock

For the first three years of Prescott’s history, there is no reported violence other than what occurred in the countryside as settlers worked on wresting the land from its original inhabitants. That changed in 1867 with the robbery of the home of a Mr. McGinley, in town with a theatrical troupe.

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By Worcester P. Bong

If you’ve been to the Prescott campus of Yavapai College attending a performance at the Performing Arts Center or taking a walk through the sculpture garden next door, you will notice the original south gates to Fort Whipple. When construction of  Yavapai College began in 1968 in Prescott, the planners had the foresight to retain these gates as a historical marker for future generations to see. So what was it like traveling past the south gates and what historical buildings were in place before Yavapai College opened in September 1970?
 

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