Items 1 to 10 of 1320 total

By Richard Gorby

Most people in the Prescott area, although familiar with Groom Creek and even Groom City, know nothing about Robert Groom, but most of them are thankful for something he gave them one hundred and twenty-five years ago-downtown Prescott.  Early in 1863, the Arizona Territory was established by President Lincoln.  By March of 1864, the territorial officers he appointed, led by Governor John Goodwin, arrived in the new Territory and had picked the site for the capital, near the new military fort, Fort Whipple which is now the site of the VA hospital, just built to protect the many new mining camps. 

Read More

By Norm Tessman

The creature may have been the last of its kind.  Of an ancient lineage, mastodons were on the brink of extinction when one of them died in a shallow watering hole some fifteen miles southwest of today's Prescott.  It was about 8,500 B.C., the last major ice age had ended, and the climate was much like that today, although there would soon be a trend toward cooler and damper weather.  That much is known; but there are many other questions about the passing of this creature, not the least of which is the cause of its death-and the possibility that it was killed by human hunters.

Read More

By Anita Nordbrock

Arizona Weekly Miner, February 16, 1877, "George Ah Fat gave a new year's dinner today at which, he informed us yesterday, he intended among other delicacies to serve tea that costs $10 per pound."  February 16, 1999, ushered in the Chinese New Year--the Year of the Rabbit--year 4697 on the Chinese lunar calendar.  From the late 1860s, until the 1930s, when Goodwin Street was extended across Granite Creek, Granite Street was paved and the last remnants of Chinatown were cleared away.  Prescott had a Chinatown.  Next time you are downtown, take the time to walk down Granite Street between Goodwin and Gurley and think about a part of Prescott that is forever gone.  In the 1860s, Granite Street was a dirt street and was the heart of Prescott's Chinatown. 

Read More

By Jean Cross

As you travel down the hill on Interstate 17 to Camp Verde, the casual driver cannot help but be in awe of the vista before him: verdant valley, red rocks and limestone cliffs.  It is sometimes difficult to stay focused on the task of maneuvering down the hill with trucks and cars racing by.  It would almost seem that there should be reduced speed limits in such a scenic area to give the traveler a chance to absorb the beauty of such a panoramic scene. 

Read More

By Elisabeth Ruffner

(Note: Jonne Markham did a great deal of research on tunnels and first published an article about them in the former weekly newspaper called THE PAPER on October 23, 1975, which is available at the Sharlot Hall Museum Library and Archives.  The following story is an updated version of the 1975, publication.)

 

The tunnels under Prescott?  Of course, everybody knows about the tunnels!  Lots of people have seen them...just ask some of the old timers!  So I asked some of the old timers: I asked Gail Gardner, poet and rancher, 1892-1988, who graduated from Prescott High School in 1909, I asked Budge Ruffner and I asked Dewey Born.  They all said they didn't know anything about tunnels and Gail was more definite: he said there weren't any. 

Read More

By Sylvia Neely

At the turn of the century many schools throughout the United States were named after some of our better know presidents.  Prescott was no exception with Washington School built in 1903, on Gurley Street, Lincoln School built in 1909, on Park Avenue, and Jefferson School at the end of Marina Street built in 1924.  Washington School still exists as the oldest continuously used school in Yavapai County.  Jefferson School was closed in 1938.

Read More

By Eleanor Gilley

(Last week in part one, the author wrote about the first railway through Prescott from Seligman, and later Ash Fork, to Phoenix) 

Financiers, looking for more railroads in Central Arizona to invest in approached Frank Murphy, who was principally responsible for bringing the railroad to Prescott, to promote another railroad into the Aqua Fria Valley and the Bradshaw Range.

Read More

By Eleanor Gilley

As the railroad left Prescott on the west side, it began its slow ascent for nine miles to the summit of the Sierra Prieta Mountains at Prieta, elevation 6,108 feet.  The view from the top was breathtakingly beautiful with the black range of mountains, the Mogollan Rim and the surrounding scenery.  The line then descended for 14 miles past Iron Springs and Ramsgate Hill around twisting, winding 12 degree curves and challenging three percent grades to Skull Valley, elevation 4,240 feet.

Read More

By Nancy Burgess

On October 1, 1998, the building now known as the Kirkland Bar and Steakhouse, was listed in the National Register of Historic Places by the U. S. Department of the Interior.  The National Register is the nation's official list of important historic buildings.  The building is significant for its contribution to the social and economic history of the community of Kirkland.

Read More

By Richard Gorby

On Prescott's Montezuma Street, in the years shortly before her 1900, fire, Chance Cob Web, located by today's The Bead Museum, was considered the best regulated, most orderly and genteel saloon on Whiskey Row. 

Read More

Items 1 to 10 of 1320 total

Close