Items 1 to 10 of 1320 total

By Al Bates

Whipple Barracks remained headquarters of the Arizona Department during the Geronimo war, but with the removal of Geronimo and his band to Florida the most serious reason for retaining either an Arizona Department or a large garrison and depot at Prescott ceased to exist.

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By Dorothy Chafin

My family was living on a ranch in the Peach Springs area at the time I was born.  Samuel Franklin Crozier and Lotti Grounds Crozier, my father and mother were both natives of Arizona.  When I was four they moved to Colorado.  My father and my uncle Bill Grounds were partners, they sold the Arizona property and bought Ora Haley's outfit consisting of a ranch on the Green River (near the Canyon of Lodore in Northwest Colorado), a ranch on the Snake River (also up in that part of Colorado) and a holding pasture in between.  The headquarters of these ranches were about 30 miles apart, so the cattle were gathered at the Green River ranch, shoved up to the Snake River ranch to add to the cattle there, and then on to summer range in California Park north of Steamboat Springs, Colorado.

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By Anne L. Foster

Today, the sidewalks of Prescott will be crowded with corsage-pinned moms happily surrounded by grateful children and gleeful grandchildren.  Mother might receive a special meal, a mailbox full of cards, and maybe even some jewelry.  Perhaps it will be a picnic at Lynx Lake or a stroll through the Plaza's craft show.  Whatever it is, it's sure to be special and to be accompanied by a lot of hugs and kisses.  Today, Prescottonians will go all out for their moms.  It didn't used to be that way.  Prescott was slow to adopt the Mother's Day celebration. 

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By Rita Wuehrmann

The untimely death of a man, Charles Bradner Rhodimer, in Missouri on a June day in 1911 set off a chain of events that resulted in my family's involvement with Prescott and Yavapai County.  My great grandfather, a saddle and harness maker, was only 33 when he succumbed to tuberculosis, leaving a cherished young wife to care for their three children.

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By Mick Woodcock

"Married Sept. 27 1865, at Mr. Sheddane's church, Rahway, N. J., at quarter past four o'clock in the afternoon.  I took the five o'clock train for Washington accompanied by Johnnie Woodruff and his bride."  So begins the diary of Margaret Griffiths Hunt McCormick, wife of second territorial governor Richard C. McCormick.  While very sketchy and incomplete, it is one of only two known sources of information on Margaret's trip west, the other source is a letter written by Margaret while on her trip that has recently been donated to the Museum.

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By Linda Ludington

The Necktie Ranch is one of Arizona's oldest ranches, containing within its holdings the original homestead of the area's first citizen, Paulino Weaver.  Weaver registered 160 acres on the Hassayampa River at a point known as Walnut Grove in July 1863.  Several ancient walnut trees still survive along the river among the willows, mesquite and cottonwoods.  Where Weaver once planted vegetables and produced sorghum sugar for the U.S. Cavalry, there are now fields of alfalfa.

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By Harley Shaw

The first scientists to cross the upper Verde watershed were members of the Army Corp of Topographical Engineers.  They traveled horseback from Zuni during the fall of 1851 under the command of Brevet Captain Lorenzo Sitgreaves.  Dr. Samuel Woodhouse was the physician on the trip, hence, by standard practice of the day, the expedition's official naturalist.  As such, he became the first biologist to collect specimens from northern Arizona.  Woodhouse and Sitgreaves had worked together earlier on a survey of the Indian Territory.  Other scientists included engineer Lieutenant J. G. Parke and artist-cartographer, Richard Kern.  The guide on the trip was trapper Antoine Leroux.  Their orders were to locate a wagon road, determine if the Zuni River provided a route to California, and assess the navigability of the lower Colorado River.  The traditional routes from Santa Fe to California were the Old Spanish Trail, which looped northward through Utah, and the other, a southern route down the Rio Grande then west through the worst of the Arizona deserts.  A more direct route through a less severe landscape was needed.

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By George Geib

On Palm Sunday 1892, St. Luke's Episcopal Church first worship building was dedicated . On Palm Sunday 2000, at 11:00 a.m., The Right Reverend Robert Shahan, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Arizona, will dedicate the new St. Luke's, the culmination of a dream which started many years ago.  As early as 1910, vestry minutes record a "suggestion by the Rector to put $3.00 from the Easter collection into a church building fund."

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By Dewey Born

Jules Baumann was born in Chur, Switzerland in 1855.  At the age of 22 he sailed to NewYork.  An older cousin, Daniel Hatz, had been a member of the Walker Party and was in the hotel and restaurant business in Prescott.  He encouraged Jules Baumann to join him which he did arriving in 1879.

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By Al Bates

The first official census of Arizona as a separate political entity was conducted in the Spring of 1864 under orders from newly-arrived Territorial Governor John Goodwin. Today's Yavapai County was included in Judicial District Three (which covered almost all of Northern Arizona) and was counted by the Rev. Hiram Reed, Arizona's first postmaster.

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