Items 1 to 10 of 1156 total

Edited by Michael Wurtz 

A Yavapai College class is currently studying the year of 1914 in an attempt to learn about history from a different perspective. The students have chosen different topics from prostitution to the status of Native Americans in Prescott.  The students will be looking to see what the town was like in 1914 in relation to these topics. 1914 is mostly known for The Great War era, which was beginning to show Europe, and the world, that battles were no longer going to be glorious as trenches lined the quiet farms of eastern France and western Russia. Although removed, for the time being, from the troubles of WWI, Prescott was celebrating its 50th anniversary of its founding in 1864.

Read More

By Michael Wurtz 

Each month the Sharlot Hall Museum LIbrary and Archives acquires documents, images, and oral histories which describe a Yavapai County that seems, to some, long gone. Other material shows us that we have not lost what makes this area a great place to live. Currently, we house over 500 feet of documents, 4000 maps, 300 oral histories, and 93,000 photographic images.

Read More

By Elisabeth Ruffner 

This is the second part of two articles regarding the City Recorder's Notes.  The first was titled, "City Recorder's Notes Provide Some Amusing Insights into Prescott History - Part 1," published September 20, 1997 and is in the SHM Days Past Archives.  The notes for these articles are about the Prescott City Council, 1876 to 1885. The unknown writer of these minutes kept his journal on the back of the Bashford-Burmister Company's invoice forms.

Read More

By Michael Wurtz 

Mollie Monroe has the unfortunate distinction of being the first woman in the Arizona Territory to be declared insane. Known at various times as Cowboy Mollie, Mary Sawyer, and the Amazon of Arizona, Mollie, born in New Hampshire in 1846, was christened Mary Elizabeth Sanger.

Read More

By Peggy Magee 

It looks out of place . . . that "Castle on the Creek" in the new Fain Park in Prescott Valley. The Gay Nineties' architecture, prevalent along Mount Vemon Street, just doesn't fit in with the surroundings along Lynx Creek. Old houses conjure up visions of families gathered together for holidays, the warmth of togetherness and memories of the happiness shared with loved ones. If the walls of the Castle could talk, you would expect to hear tales of joy and laughter.  However, these walls have a much different tale to tell.

Read More

By Mick Woodcock 

"What's in a name?," asked Shakespeare's Romeo. Twentieth century people ask a version of that when they visit Sharlot Hall Museum's Fort Misery. "Why is it called that?" they query. This brings out a fairly long response from the Musuem docent relating the history of one of its owners and his hospitality. Along with this is the fact that the building has nothing to do with military history at all. The truth about Fort Misery's name makes an interesting anecdote involving another the of the Museum's buildings, the Governor's Mansion.

Read More

By Edward and Diane Stasack 

Liar or Legend? No one has said that Captain William F. Drannan (1832-1913), Chief of Scouts, was a fictional character, just that he was a liar. So suggests Harvey L. Carter, author of one of the most authoritative books on Kit Carson. In his book Dear Old Kit, Carter asserts, "what was narrated as fact by [this man] was actually a tissue of lies."

Read More

By Pat Atchison 

The flu. Nobody wants it. Everyone tries to keep from getting it. We have all used it as a reason for missing work, school or a meeting.  In the fall of 1918, an influenza epidemic struck the United States with a force that was never again equaled. It had raged through Europe in May, June and July before reaching the U.S. Commonly called "Spanish Influenza," its place of origin was never officially determined.

Read More

By Warren Miller 

Left allemande and a right hand grand. 
Plant your taters in a sandy land, 
And promenade back to the same old stand. 

Square dancing, a distinctly American tradition with ancient roots in European and British Isles dancing, has been a part of the Prescott scene since its founding in 1864. It continues to provide fun, exercise, and a wonderfully pleasant opportunity to enjoy the company of friends to hundreds of Prescott area folks. The driving, toe-tapping fiddle music that it is danced to has also been with us since the earliest settlers came West.

Read More

By Elisabeth Ruffner 

This is the first of two articles regarding these City Recorder's Notes.  Please read "City Recorder Keeps Prescott Posted of Early Times - Part 2," published on November 22, 1997 and in the SHM Days Past Archives.  The notes for these articles are about the Prescott City Council, 1876 to 1885. The unknown writer of these minutes kept his journal on the back of the Bashford-Burmister Company's invoice forms.

It was ever thus.. 

In the spirit of poking a little gentle fun at ourselves, the following has been excerpted from the notes of an unknown diligent recorder who created a list of city council (or precedent body) actions typed on invoice forms of The Bashford-Burmister Company, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Groceries, Mining Supplies, Dry Goods, Hardware, Boots and Shoes, etc. The following excerpts are copied "as is" from the notes, including spelling errors: 

Read More

Items 1 to 10 of 1156 total

Close