Items 1 to 10 of 1090 total

By Pat Atchison 

Memorial Day, or Decoration Day as it was then called, was first widely observed in the United States on May 30, 1868. The original intent was to honor the Union soldiers killed during the Civil War by decorating their gravesites. 

Decoration Day was not mentioned in the local newspaper until May 27,1881. That brief announcement stated, "Next Monday will be Decoration Day, and it is to be generally observed in the States." Tuesday's edition said simply "Yesterday was Decoration Day."

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By Michael Wurtz

Merle Allen, a Prescott resident of seventy-seven years, passed away on March 4, 1997. His business career, beginning in 1920, included a milk depot, a grocery store that grew into three stores, and a wholesale grocery business. Much of the Allen family history, including an oral interview, is documented at the Sharlot Hall Museum Archives and Library. Within the collection is this article that appeared in the Prescott Evening Courier on June 26, 1936.

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By Mona McCroskey 

In 1914, George and Addie Allan moved to Prescott for the health of their son George. They also moved their greenhouse and flower shop business from Princeton, New Jersey, to Prescott. The Allan's purchased the old Sanders ranch in Miller Valley and built their first greenhouse at what is now 350 Whipple Street, in the area known as Allandale.

 

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By Sylvia Neely 

In light of the recent closing of Mata Dexter School the Sharlot Hall Museum felt it is appropriate to reiterate who Dexter was and what she meant to the community of Prescott. 

In his book Meeting The Four O'clock Train, Dixon Fagerburg, Jr., recalls his first-grade-teacher, Mata Dexter:

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Submitted by Michael Wurtz

Few events in Prescott's history have so stirred the community as the death of Margaret Hunt McCormick, wife of the Governor. On the 130th anniversary of her death, the Sharlot Hall Museum presents her obituary from the Arizona Miner, May 4, 1867:

"DIED At Prescott, Arizona, on Tuesday April 30, 1867, at 7 p.m., Margaret Griffiths Hunt, daughter of Isaac L. Hunt, Esq., of Rahway, New Jersey, and wife of Hon. Richard C. McCormick, Governor of Arizona. Aged 24. 

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By Elisabeth Ruffner 

National Historic Preservation Week has traditionally been observed the second week in May. Arizona has chosen to designate the entire month of April to recognize and celebrate the state's cultural heritage and the people and places for which the past holds great meaning and significance. The theme this year is "Moving Forward with the Past".

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By Nancy Burgess 

It was 1898 and successful Prescott businessman Henry Brinkmeyer and his wife, Ina Muzik Brinkmeyer, were having a new house built in the 'country', in the Fleury's Addition on West Gurley Street. Mr. and Mrs. Brinkmeyer and their two children, Henry, Jr. and Marcella, had been living at the Brinkmeyer Hotel on North Montezuma Street. This hotel would later burn in the fire of July 14, 1900 and would be rebuilt of brick at the same location. Henry decided that it would be best to build a house with a yard so that the children would have a place to play.

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By Sue Abbey 

History is alive and well! When you spend twenty years of your career in one place, many incidents stand out in your mind. When that career means dealing with people, some of them stand out in pivotal way; a way that can change you.

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By William Bork 

Thumb Butte stands like a sentinel in full dress on an early postcard sold by W. H. Timerhoff, a Prescott druggist. Another card depicts in clear detail part of Prescott's other famous landmark, Granite Dells, then called "Point of Rocks," ten miles to the Butte's northeast. These two viewcards are finely printed vignettes of the landscape near our town, as they appeared in the early 1900's. 

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By Norm Tessman

Tents to log cabins to shopping centers as seen from the 'Sphinx'. 

To the Yavapai People, Thumb Butte was Nymit-gi-yaka, "Mountain Lion Lying Down." Anglo pioneers called it "the Sphinx," and wrote legends about its powers. Thumb Butte has always been symbolic of our community, and generations of Prescottonians have looked down upon the town from atop its 6,522-foot summit.

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